Heat Related Illness

 

 

There are three stages of Heat Related Illness:

Heat Stress

Symptoms:
Cool, moist skin
Weakness
Dizziness
Nausea

Heat Exhaustion

Symptoms:
Weak Pulse
Shallow breathing
Clammy skin
Pale face
Loss of appetite
Possible confusion and irritability

Heat Stroke

Symptoms:
Rapid and strong pulse
Hot, dry skin
High temperature
Flushed face

Treatment:
Move to a cool place.
Sit person in the shade.
Loosen clothing.
Give regular sips of plain water.


Treatment:
Lay patient in the shade.
Remove or loosen clothing.
Sponge with cool water and fan.
Give frequent drinks of water if concious.
Seek medical attention.

Treatment:
Call an ambulance.
Lay the patient in the shade.
Remove and/or loosen clothing.
Sponge copiously with water and fan.
Give frequent drinks of water.
Take the patient to hospital.


Burns

Do's

  • Remove victim from danger
  • Cool burn area with gently running water for at least 10 minutes.
  • Cover burn with sterile, non stick dressing.
  • Convey to hospital
  • Treat for possible shock

 

Don'ts

  • Do not apply lotions or ointments.
  • Do not pick or break blisters.
  • Do not over-cool casualty.
  • Do not put towels, cotton wool, blankets or adhesive dressings directly onto the burn.
  • Do not remove clothing which is stuck to the skin.

 

 

Smoke Inhalation

Prolonged exposure to heavy smoke can be fatal.  Smoke irritates the eyes and lungs and contains Carbon Monoxide which is poisonous.

Too much smoke can reduce your performance and bring on fatigue more quickly.

Minimise the effects of Smoke

  • Avoid unneccessary exposure to smoke.
  • Use smoke masks and goggles, or if necessary a handkerchief or other cloth to cover your nose and mouth.  Note:  This will not protect you from toxic gasses in the smoke!
  • In situations where there is heavy smoke be aware that fresh air pockets may be found near the ground.

People who collapse from smoke inhalation must receive medical attention as a matter of urgency.  It may be necessary to administer CPR (Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscition) until help arrives.

Borrowed from FESA Volunteer Learning Manual - Safety and Survival


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